Three quick steps to winter carrots

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Carrots are the most popular crop in our winter garden with the cold temperatures turning the roots into sugar-filled ‘candy carrots’. Our winter carrots are planted in mid-summer in both garden beds and cold frames, and although ‘Napoli’ and ‘Yaya’ yield the sweetest orange carrots, the kids also like to seed a rainbow of colours including red, yellow, white, and purple.

Once the November temperatures start to nose-dive, we deep mulch the carrot beds before the ground freezes. By pre-gathering the materials – I keep bags of shredded autumn leaves beside my compost bin – winterizing our carrot beds takes just 5 quick minutes.

Related post: Corn salad is a great winter green

3 steps to winter carrots:

1 – Gather your materials. You’ll need shredded leaves or straw, a row cover or bed sheet, and a few rocks for weighing down the cover. You can also use garden staples like these, to secure the fabric. They work great, but will poke small holes in the covers. I only use staples when I have old row covers that are already well used and I don’t mind further damage.

2 – Cover your carrot bed with a 1 to 1 1/2 foot deep layer of mulch.

3 – Top the mulch with the row cover or sheet and weigh down with rocks (or logs). This will prevent the mulch from blowing away.

Bonus step – Add a bamboo stake beside the bed so that you know where to dig when the garden is covered in snow!

Related Post – A simple mulch

Do you harvest winter carrots? 

Want winter carrots? Its easier than you think! Learn how with Savvy Gardening.

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4 Responses to Three quick steps to winter carrots

  1. Cindi says:

    When is the last date you can plant carrots and beets for a fall crop?

  2. Barclay A. Dunn says:

    For cold frames, do the plants grow their greens up into the foot of mulch? I’m confused as to what this looks like once they are well underway growing.

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